Netizen 24 CAN: Margot Kidder, 69, who played Lois Lane in Superman franchise, dies

Posted by On 2:08 PM

Margot Kidder, 69, who played Lois Lane in Superman franchise, dies

Margot Kidder, who played Lois Lane in "Superman" opposite Christopher Reeve, has died at age 69. (The Canadian Press)
Mon., May 14, 2018

LIVINGSTON, MONT.â€"Margot Kidder, who starred as Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in the Superman film franchise of the late 1970s and early 1980s, has died.

Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Mont., posted a notice on its website saying Kidder died Sunday at her home. She was 69.

“We are deeply saddened by Margot’s unexpected death,” Annie Kidder, Margot’s sister, a well-known education activist in Toronto, said in a statement.

“She was a beloved mother, sister and aunt and a truly larger-than-life presence to her fans, to those who worked with her for the public good, and to all who knew her.”

Her family is requesting privacy.

Article Cont inued Below

“Her passion and commitment to the arts, civil and Indigenous people’s rights, mental health and the environment were inspirations to us all and epitomized in her work,” the statement said. “She has created an enduring legacy as an actor, a Canadian and, most importantly, as a member of our family.”

Canadian actress Margot Kidder’s career-defining role as Lane in Superman, helped created a superhero blockbuster two decades before comic book movies became the norm at the top of the box office.
Canadian actress Margot Kidder’s career-defining role as Lane in Superman, helped created a superhero blockbuster two decades before comic book movies became the norm at the t op of the box office.

Kidder’s career-defining role as Lane in Superman, helped created a superhero blockbuster two decades before comic book movies became the norm at the top of the box office.

Both Kidder and Reeve, who played Superman, were relative unknowns when they got their leading parts, and neither saw many major roles afterward. Reeve died in 2004.

Kidder, who was born in Yellowknife, also appeared in 1975’s The Great Waldo Pepper with Robert Redford and 1978’s The Amityville Horror.

She went on to become an advocate for mental health issues after speaking out about living with bipolar disorder.

She was a political activist in recent years and was among a group of environmentalists to be arrested outside the White House in 2011 during a protest against TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline.

Kidder became an American citizen, and had settled in Montana to live in a “culture-free zone” away from the spotlight and close to her daughter and grandchildren.

The Star’s Richard Ouzounian wrote in 2010 that, on the way to her so-called golden years, she radiated energy to light up a room.

She was starring in a show called Love, Loss and What I Wore, written by Nora and Delia Ephron, while in Toronto.

“One of the things when you pass 60 is that your life gets to be about a series of losses that mount like a funeral pyre,” she told the Star at the time. “You develop a hyper-awareness that you’re in the last stretch. It’s very liberating and very empowering in some ways, but it’s also bittersweet. It’s a very Buddhist place you have to get into if you’re going to cope with all of it.”

Born in Yellowknife in 1948, she grew up in what she calls “a fiercely political household. It didn’t matter what side you took, but you had to be up on every issue and prepared to defend what you believed in.”

She maintained her acting career until her death, and recent credits include Rob Zombie’s Halloween II in 2009, as well as a series of Canadian films, including The Neighborhood and The Red Maple Leaf.

In recent years, she often worked with Frank D’Angelo, the local beverage business owner who has also written and directed several films, and the pair became friends.

“I made five movies with her, and she would have been in every single one of my movies, except logistically she was busy fighting the Keystone pipeline,” said D’Angelo in an interview. “She was just a straight-up great human being, and everyone on the set loved her.”

D’Angelo had her as a guest on his Being Frank talk show, saying she was very candid about her past.

“The last time I was in contact with Margot, she contacted me five-six weeks ago, when my Dad passed away, to give her condolenses to me. It's been a brutal year,” said D’Angelo. “She wa s a great Canadian. She deserves to be celebrated as one of the best actors that ever existed in this country. I loved her.”

Before landing the gig that would go on to define her career, Kidder appeared in the 1973 cult thriller Sisters as Siamese twins, as well as two horror films, Black Christmas in 1974 and The Amityville Horror in 1979, as one half of the tortured married Lutz couple.

She scored the coveted role of Superman’s paramour Lane in 1976 after a lucky call earned her a screen test by director Richard Donner.

“I’d never read comics, so I didn’t know much about Superman,” she said in 2009. “But I read this very funny script, and I went in and did a couple scenes, and next thing I knew, I was being flown to England to screen-test, and that was that.”

Kidder has said signing on to the film also marked the end of her first marriage to novelist Thomas McGuane, the father of her only child, daughter Maggie, a s he wanted her to be a “subservient writer’s wife.”

Kidder also famously dated then-Canadian PM Pierre Trudeau.

The Superman franchise shot her to international fame, something she later called “the weirdest thing in the world.”

“I still get stopped for being Lois Lane, and I’m 60 and have two grandchildren,” she told The AV Club. “So it’s kind of weird.”

Kidder and Reeve reprised their roles as the famous duo three more times, in 1980’s Superman II, 1983’s Superman III, and 1987’s Superman IV: The Quest for Peace.

Kidder maintained a steady stream of roles, including the 1981 film Heartaches and a 2002 Broadway gig in The Vagina Monologues, as well as appearances on TV shows in the 2000s, including Law & Order: SVU, The L Word, Brothers & Sisters, Smallville and R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour, which won her an Emmy i n 2015.

With files from Raju Mudhar

TOP STORIES, DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX.NEW NEWSLETTERHEADLINESSIGN UPSource: Google News

Next
« Prev Post
Previous
Next Post »